Project News

The project is currently in the design phase.

About this project

Overview

Highest number of crashes in the SR 432 Corridor. Congestion along Industrial Way occurs today and will worsen in the future as traffic volumes increase. Click to view and download a larger version.

Highest number of crashes in the SR 432 Corridor. Congestion along Industrial Way occurs today and will worsen in the future as traffic volumes increase. Click to view a larger version.

In 2015, the Washington State Legislature allocated $85 million for the design, engineering and construction of the Industrial Way (State Route 432) and Oregon Way (State Route 433) Intersection Project, which will elevate the highways and separate vehicular traffic from train traffic. This intersection provides a vital transportation and economic connection between communities and supports freight movement. Without the Industrial Way and Oregon Way Intersection Project, travel delays will become more common, as traffic volumes increase, congestion worsens, roadway blockages from train crossings become more frequent, and travel times become less reliable. Traffic volumes at the intersection are expected to increase 40-50 percent by 2040.

In spring 2018, a locally preferred design alternative was identified, but the estimated project cost was much higher than the funded $85 million, primarily due to findings that deeper foundations were needed for the bridge structures. In an effort to reduce the project cost, while meeting the project needs, WSDOT is continuing work with local partners to simplify the project design. Meanwhile, the City of Longview and its partners are seeking an additional $13 million through the rural USDOT Infrastructure for Rebuilding America (INFRA) and Better Utilizing Investments to Leverage Development (BUILD) grants. The grant application materials are available in the Documents section. Grant decisions are expected by fall 2020.

Goals and Objectives:

  • image-for-homepageMaintain access to commercial and industrial areas and the Columbia River
  • Enhance new business development opportunities
  • Maintain and create  job opportunities
  • Maintain local business viability
  • Minimize adverse impacts to the environment and community
  • Avoid adverse, disproportionate impacts to low income and minority populations
  • Improve safety for motorists, pedestrians and bicyclists; and
  • Enhance the regional, national and international economic competitiveness of the Port of Longview and existing businesses

History

The existing highway deficiencies were recognized as early as 1968 when the Washington State Department of Transportation completed a Reconnaissance Report in 1968 and followed by a preliminary design of the Oregon Way Interchange at SR 432 in 1971. By 1988, the Lower Columbia ports requested that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers study the deepening of the Columbia River shipping channel to help the region become competitive in the global marketplace. The river deepening increased interest in moving freight through the region, leading to further study of the transportation system that connects to the Columbia River and the Port of Longview in order to handle increasing volumes of freight.

Schedule